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Students found 'Queer and Asian' group on campus

18mr:

“I never met [a] gay Korean before,” Ian Jeong, a sophomore in Nursing, said. “When you grow up in an environment where there aren’t many out Asians, you feel isolated.”

The 40-50 students who are involved with Penn Q&A — Queer and Asian — are aiming to remedy this problem. The club creates a safe space specifically for them, which has not existed on campus before.

Many Asian-American students are involved in either Asian or LGBTQ communities, but hardly ever both. Jeong has observed that they are more likely to join an Asian community than a group in the Lambda alliance. Even within Queer People of Color, a student group on campus, the representation of Asian queer students was relatively low because a lot of them were reluctant to be active members, he said.

“Gender binary is very strong in [the] Asian community,” Jeong said.

In addition to creating a community on campus, the group aims to support queer asian students.

“Being Asian and LGBT, we have our own specific issues we have to deal with that other LGBT minorities don’t have to,” Kevin Lin, a sophomore in Wharton and the founding member, said.

For instance, coming out to traditional Asian parents is a huge challenge.

“A lot of East Asian countries in the older generations don’t recognize the existence of LGBT youth,” Eliot Oblander , a sophomore in College and Wharton, said. “They see it like a disease brought in by Westerners.”

Q&A is at the very early stage as a nascent organization. The members wrote their constitution Saturday, and are currently seeking recognition from Lambda Alliance — the umbrella organization for LGBTQ student groups — and Asian Pacific Student Coalition.

The group is currently encouraging a sense of community within the members with upcoming social events.

Q&A is a space for everyone. Out queer students can meet other queer people. For those who are selectively out, the group is a safe space where they can be open, Jeong said.

Even for those who haven’t come out yet, Q&A is an assurance that there is a supportive community. “We want to be very visible,” Jeong said. “Just by being visible, people will know there is a group they can go to.”

The number of LGBTQ-related student organizations on campus is growing, with many of them targeting a specific demographic. Last semester, students founded a club for International LGBTQ students. Existing niche LGBTQ groups on campus include Queer Ladies at Penn, J-Bagel and Queer Christian Fellowship.

“There are both pros and cons of many niche organizations,” Bob Schoenberg , director of the LGBT Center, said. “Pro is that students have identified a place where their specific identities and needs can be addressed.”

On the other hand, Schoenberg also suggested the possibility of collaboration between many organizations can be difficult.

“It’s both an opportunity and a challenge,” he said.

-JS

(via j-asexyrex)

Grace Lee Boggs-Inktober 8 by Robert Trujillo

Grace Lee Boggs-Inktober 8 by Robert Trujillo

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Speakers address the crowd .

Saturday, October 11th

(via yellowxperil)

silverheartcat:

onlyblackgirl:

Indigenous People’s Day Photo Project 2013

"Dear Columbus…"

Photo Credit: Andrew Burlingham

South Puget Sound Community College’s Diversity & Equity Center

Olympia, WA 

Yes. YES. Fuck Columbus forever.

I’ll always distinctly remember being a -child-, maybe 7? and even then being so horribly angry about Columbus. I was originally vocal about it. The real kicker? I quickly learned to shut up about how I felt.
I tried to talk about how infuriating it was to learn how Columbus invaded and destroyed an entire native people. And every adult I talked to tried to convince me everything Columbus did was totally okay. Apparently children aren’t supposed to learn about Columbus and find him to be anything but ~brave~ and ~adventurous~ or some shit.
I’m still, even now, fucking appalled anyone, ANYONE, could so easily and thoughtlessly try to indoctrinate a small child into accepting genocide of native people. It’s …disgusting, and so extremely telling of how far our culture will go in its dehumanization and erasure of the violence native people endured and continue to endure at our hands.

So. Yes. Fuck Columbus.
I hope someday we all celebrate Indigenous People Day and only remember Columbus for his crimes against humanity.

(via arianathepoet)

Esther Wang interviews Alex Hing, Founder of the Red Guard

(Source: 18mr, via asamstudiesintro)

blexicana:

im1004:

1968, Asian American high school students attend the Black Panther Party funeral rally for Bobby Hutton,16 years old BPP member.

Now that’s what I’m talking about!

Photo by Nikki Arai (who also took the famous photo of Richard Aoki). On April 12, 1968, Oakland High students walked out to attend the memorial rally. Bobby Hutton was killed by OPD on April 6, 1968, two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

blexicana:

im1004:

1968, Asian American high school students attend the Black Panther Party funeral rally for Bobby Hutton,16 years old BPP member.

Now that’s what I’m talking about!

Photo by Nikki Arai (who also took the famous photo of Richard Aoki). On April 12, 1968, Oakland High students walked out to attend the memorial rally. Bobby Hutton was killed by OPD on April 6, 1968, two days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

(via lottastuff)

Los Angeles Stands Against Gentrification & Displacement!

corazonenlucha:

image

image

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imageimage

Please join Los Angeles for LA Gente Blog's nationwide social media campaign to answer how gentrification hurts your communities. Post your image with the hashtags #OURHOODSMATTER #WEFIGHTDISPLACEMENT 


…. Even Junot Díaz is against gentrification in Los Angeles, and all over the country. Send us your image at  losangeles4LAgente@gmail.com

(via corazonenlucha)

18mr:

99-year-old movement legend Grace Lee Boggs is in hospice care, and our thoughts are with her as she completes her life’s journey.

I am coming to the end of a long journey—a journey that began over 70 years ago at the beginning of World War II. This journey has basically been to show that there is an alternative to the Bolshevik revolutionary prototype. It has taken us a long time to accomplish this, but we have been able to do so both as a result of our historical vision and because of the very practical efforts of comrades who have risen to the challenge of creating a revolution unlike any revolution that has been in the past.
Because of my increasing physical limitations in the last few years, I have not been able to play the role that I might have played. But that is not as important now as recognizing what has been achieved. A revolution that is based on the people exercising their creativity in the midst of devastation is one of the great historical contributions of humankind.
We will be finding ways and means to celebrate this, one of which will be the Reimagining Work and Culture conference in October. We want people to understand how much this concept of new work and new culture is based upon not only enormous activity but also on vision and on imagination.
Grace Lee Boggs, Detroit, MI, 9/23/2014

- CM

18mr:

99-year-old movement legend Grace Lee Boggs is in hospice care, and our thoughts are with her as she completes her life’s journey.

I am coming to the end of a long journey—a journey that began over 70 years ago at the beginning of World War II. This journey has basically been to show that there is an alternative to the Bolshevik revolutionary prototype. It has taken us a long time to accomplish this, but we have been able to do so both as a result of our historical vision and because of the very practical efforts of comrades who have risen to the challenge of creating a revolution unlike any revolution that has been in the past.

Because of my increasing physical limitations in the last few years, I have not been able to play the role that I might have played. But that is not as important now as recognizing what has been achieved. A revolution that is based on the people exercising their creativity in the midst of devastation is one of the great historical contributions of humankind.

We will be finding ways and means to celebrate this, one of which will be the Reimagining Work and Culture conference in October. We want people to understand how much this concept of new work and new culture is based upon not only enormous activity but also on vision and on imagination.

Grace Lee Boggs, Detroit, MI, 9/23/2014

- CM

(via asamstudiesintro)

18mr:

Fast food workers struggling for a wage of $15 an hour and the right to unionize participated in a nonviolent civil disobedience action last week. 

This is Emily Nguyen (ponytail) and Kalia Vang (visor). Emily is 20 years-old and a sophomore at Sacramento City College. She’s worked in fast food for a year and a half and makes California minimum wage ($9 an hour). She says, “I’m just working to breathe, to stay alive. I’m not really living life. We won’t stop till we meet our destination, till our wages go up.”

 Watch the emotional video of their arrest here, and be sure to support them on Facebook here!

(via iampaultran)

bad-doing:

i found these two photographs, taken from a 1982 strike organized by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (IGLWU) Local 23-25 in chinatown.

as dopey as it is, there’s something powerful about seeing women whose stories are so alike the stories of my mother and my aunts — these images are on the shortlist for my favorites ever.

found at:
Labor Arts
Amerasia Journal, 35(1), 2009

characters on the signs read:
讓我們站在一起
"Let us stand together."

(via asamstudiesintro)

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